It is the responsibility of every adult to make a Will.

This responsibility applies to husbands and wives, couples who are just living together, young people and old people, and people who are single. It is particularly important to make a Will if you own property or other assets, or if you have children from one relationship or perhaps from several relationships.

If you die without having made a Will then you leave behind for your loved ones a situation of great uncertainty and a great many unnecessary problems such as:

The loved ones you would have wished to benefit from your Will, if you had made one, may in fact now receive absolutely no benefits at all from your estate. The loved ones whom you would have wanted to look after any of your minor children may not in fact be entitled to do so. The loved ones whom you would have wanted to be able to continue to live in certain property owned by you may not in fact be able to do so. The loved ones whom you would have wanted to continue to receive the benefits of your previous pension may not in fact be able to do so. You will potentially cause great conflict between, and great expense for, all the loved ones you leave behind, at a time that when they are least able to cope. Your own wishes may not in fact be carried out at all. It is true that solicitors make much more money out of unravelling Estates where there is no Will then they ever do dealing with Estates where the deceased has been prudent enough and responsible enough to make a Will.

There is therefore absolutely no question that it makes sense to have an up-to-date Will and that you will ultimately save yourself money by doing so, and perhaps more importantly save the loved ones you leave behind from unnecessary heartache.